WHO IS ANNE FRANK?

 

“When I write, I can shake off all my cares.” 
- Anne Frank (April 5, 1944)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Born on June 12, 1929, Anne Frank was a Jewish teenager from Frankfurt, Germany who was forced to go into hiding during the Holocaust. She and her family, along with four others, spent over two years during World War II hiding in an annex of rooms on Prinsengracht in Amsterdam, today known as the Anne Frank House.

 

Since it was first published in 1947, Anne Frank’s diary has become one of the most powerful memoirs of the Holocaust. Its message of courage and hope in the face of adversity has reached millions. The diary has been translated into 70 languages with over 30 million copies sold. Anne Frank’s story is especially meaningful to young people today. For many she is their first, if not their only exposure to the history of the Holocaust.

After being betrayed to the Nazis, Anne, her family, and the others living with them were arrested and deported to Nazi concentration camps. In March of 1945, seven months after she was arrested, Anne Frank died of typhus at Bergen-Belsen. She was fifteen years old.

 

Her wisdom and legacy live on, and she is frequently cited as an inspiration for today, with her insights into human nature, her relentless optimism, and her vivid portrayal of her experience in hiding as a teenager.
 

 

Purchase your copy of
Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl

Discovered in the attic in which she spent the last years of her life, Anne Frank’s remarkable diary has become a world classic—a powerful reminder of the horrors of war and an eloquent testament to the human spirit. 

Copies of the book, Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl, are available for purchase through Penguin Random House, the English-language publisher of the diary. You can also receive a complimentary copy when you make a $100 donation to the Anne Frank Center, to help us bring the lessons of Anne Frank's life and legacy to children in communities throughout the US.

Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl

Discovered in the attic in which she spent the last years of her life, Anne Frank’s remarkable diary has become a world classic—a powerful reminder of the horrors of war and an eloquent testament to the human spirit. 

Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl

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Supplemental Resources

 

The Anne Frank Center provides information and educational materials about Anne Frank, the history of the Holocaust, and discrimination today. These downloadable companions for use in the classroom when teaching with the Diary, the Play, or with one of our traveling exhibits, inspire critical thinking, learning-by-doing, interaction, multi-method, and student-centered activities:

 

Free download

August 4, 2019 marks the 75th anniversary of the arrest of the Frank family, who had been in hiding for two years during Nazi occupation of Europe. This downloadable guide offers activities for summer camp discussion about the historical significance, including guided readings from the diary. 

Developed by Gillian Walnes Perry MBE (Community Outreach Ambassador for the Anne Frank Center USA and founding director of the Anne Frank Trust UK).

Free download

The Anne Frank Center provides information and educational materials about Anne Frank, the history of the Holocaust, and discrimination today. This downloadable companion for use in the classroom when teaching with the Diary, the Play, or with one of our traveling exhibits, inspires critical thinking, learning-by-doing, interaction, multi-method, and student-centered activities.

Bring the principles of "mutual respect" into the classroom with this tabloid-sized wall poster detailing a pledge of 15 rules to live by, such as "treat other with fairness" and "work together to find the best solutions." Developed in conjunction with Mrs. Sara Dacus and her 8th grade English students at AHLF Junior High School, Searcy, Arkansas. 

The letter-sized flyer version of our AFC "Mutual Respect" poster detailing a pledge of 15 rules to live by, such as "look for what we have in common" and "remember that good people can agree o disagree." Developed in conjunction with Mrs. Sara Dacus and her 8th grade English students at AHLF Junior High School, Searcy, Arkansas. 

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EXCERPTS FROM THE DIARY

On writing a diary

Mr. Bolkestein, the Cabinet Minister, speaking on the Dutch broadcast from London, said that after the war a collection would be made of diaries and letters dealing with the war. Of course, everyone pounced on my diary.

- March 29, 1944

When I write, I can shake off all my cares.

- April 5, 1944

On still believing

It’s a wonder I haven’t abandoned all my ideals, they seem so absurd and impractical. Yet I cling to them because I still believe, in spite of everything, that people are truly good at heart. 


It’s utterly impossible for me to build my life on a foundation of chaos, suffering and death. I see the world being slowly transformed into a wilderness, I hear the approaching thunder that, one day, will destroy us too, I feel the suffering of millions.

 

And yet, when I look up at the sky, I somehow feel that everything will change for the better, that this cruelty too shall end, that peace and tranquility will return once more.

- July 15, 1944

 

On being herself

Let me be myself and then I am satisfied. I know that I'm a woman, a woman with inward strength and plenty of courage.

- April 11, 1944

 

On the helpers


It’s amazing how much these generous and unselfish people do risking their own lives to help and save others.
 

The best example of this is our own helpers, who have managed to pull us through so far and will hopefully bring us safely to shore, because otherwise they’ll find themselves sharing the fate of those they’re trying to protect.

Never have they uttered a single word about the burden we must be, never have they complained that we’re too much trouble. […] They put on their most cheerful expressions, bring flowers and gifts for birthdays and holidays and are always ready to do what they can.

That’s something we should never forget; while others display their heroism in battle or against the Germans, our helpers prove theirs every day by their good spirits and affection.

- January 28, 1944

Inspiring every generation to build the more compassionate world Anne Frank envisioned.

ABOUT US >

The Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect preserves the legacy of the young diarist through education and arts programming. We work to create the kinder and fairer world of which Anne Frank dreamed.
 

The Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization. Please support us to help us continue our mission. Contributions to the organization are tax deductible to the extent permitted by law.

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© 2018 by Anne Frank Center USA

All quotations from Anne Frank and photos of the Frank family are used by permission and copyright ANNE FRANK FONDS Basel, Switzerland.